Author Archives: Pamela

8 Common Fishing Mistakes Anglers Make

Most anglers dream of the perfect catch, but simple mistakes can prevent you from reeling in the fish. Here are some pitfalls to avoid when fishing:

Not changing the hook

Don’t cast out with an old hook. An old, dull hook can cause frustration when fish easily unhook and swim away. Also, choose a hook appropriate for the size of fish you’re trying to catch. If the fish has a small mouth, use a small hook. For panfish, use a size 6 or 8 hook.

Forgetting to replace the line

Fishing line tends to get worn out after use. By replacing the line on a regular basis, you’ll have fewer kinks in your cast. Changing the line regularly also ensures the reel has enough line to get your lure far enough into the water.

Skipping the bobber or using the wrong one

Bobbers are useful, especially for beginning anglers as they allow for direct observation, making it easier to tell when a fish is on the line. If you’re prone to snags, a bobber can help keep the hook up so it doesn’t get caught. You also need to use the correct size — use a one-inch or smaller bobber for panfish.

Not fishing at the right depth

As summer weather heats up, fish tend to stay in the top 12 feet of water. From mid-June through the rest of the summer, keep this in mind to have the best chance of catching a fish. To see how deep to fish for certain species, check out this infographic.

Fishing in the middle of the afternoon

Fish tend to take cover during the heat of the day. In the morning before the heat, or in the evening after it’s cooled off, provide the best fishing windows.

Reeling too quickly

The summer heat can cause fish to become lazy and sluggish. They may not have the energy to grab on to a fast moving lure, so reeling a bit slower can create an easier target.

Fishing in the wrong location

While it can be tempting to fish in a wide open area, that could cost you a catch. Fish tend to stay close to structures, such as brush piles and stumps. To figure out hot spots, check out the DNR’s Where to Fish website.

Not trying something new

It’s easy to get stuck in a routine. However, if you’re not having any luck, trying something new might do the trick. Move to a different spot, change your lure or even reel at a different speed to find what works.

For the Iowa DNR article go to: https://www.iowadnr.gov/About-DNR/DNR-News-Releases/ArticleID/2506/8-common-fishing-mistakes-anglers-make

Heavy Rainfall Causes Multiple Wastewater and Manure Releases

Following heavy rainfall and flash flooding throughout much of Iowa, the DNR encourages Iowans to stay out of Iowa streams until after the waters recede.

While fast stream currents are the biggest risk for people, high waters can also carry dangerous debris and bacteria. “For their own safety, we encourage people to stay out of the water until several days after streams return to normal,” said Scott Wilson in the DNR’s Spencer field office.

“About 70 wastewater discharges have been reported over the Memorial Day weekend, and the calls are still coming in,” Wilson said. With more rain predicted, additional discharges are expected.

“Some cities have reported multiple wastewater discharges, and two have reported storm water backups into basements,” he added. Both the Iowa DNR and the Department of Public Health have helpful links for people dealing with disasters and flood cleanup.

Some livestock facilities, particularly in northwest Iowa, have had two to four or more inches of rain. “Most of these facilities are OK, but we are working with a few to stop runoff,” Wilson said.

Facilities that are discharging or expecting to discharge should contact their local DNR field office. “We’ll work with them to identify solutions and minimize impacts to nearby streams,” Wilson said.

After hours, facilities can call the DNR emergency spill line at 515-725-8694. The DNR website has more information about spill reporting requirements.

For the Iowa DNR article go to: https://www.iowadnr.gov/About-DNR/DNR-News-Releases/ArticleID/2470/Heavy-rainfall-causes-multiple-wastewater-and-manure-releases

Tips for Helping a Turtle Cross the Road

Eastern Box Turtle

Article credits to: By Danielle Brigida, USFWS

Photo credits to:  by Danielle Brigida, USFWS

This time of year many wildlife, like turtles, are on the move. As the weather warms, turtles go in search for new territory, breeding opportunities and quests for food. Also, many females will travel to find ideal places to lay their eggs and will often cross the roads. Please keep a lookout for them while you’re driving this season.

Helping Turtles Cross the Street

  1. Always keep your own safety in mind — watch out for oncoming vehicles, signal properly when pulling over and recognize your surroundings first before working to help save an animal.
  2. Be very careful when moving the animal (it could be injured or it could bite you depending on what species). If possible, sometimes it is best to just stand guard as the animal crosses the road on its own.
  3.  If the animal needs to be moved, move it to the other side of the road in the same direction it was going. Using a car mat can be a good way to help the turtles across without actually picking them up. By using a car mat or putting something under the turtle, you can slide the turtle in the direction it was going.
  4. Do not pick the turtle up by the tail. Some turtles may be frightened and will try to bite (like snapping turtles). Do not pick them up by the tail! Here’s a great video showing ways to safely help a snapping turtle in the road such as the car mat trick, or by holding them at the
  5.  Do NOT take it with you — please only focus on helping it get safely to the other side.
  6. Get involved with roadside restoration and transportation projects: We’re working to make our roads and roadsides work for transportation and the environment. Learn more about road ecology and wildlife for ways to get involved at a local level.
    base of the shell and not the side.
  7. Learn more about wildlife laws in your state. Contact your State and Territorial Fish and Wildlife Office to verify what is legal for your state and ways you can get involved. You also are always welcome to contact your closest National Wildlife Refuge to learn more about what species to look out for.

    8. If possible, snap a photo and report sightings Herp Mapper to help track the movements of these reptiles.

Monthly Feature: Species 101: Dragonflies

Blue Dasher

 Calico Pennant

 Twelve-Spotted Skimmer

Photos Credits to Pam Wolter

Dragonflies are considered to be one of the oldest ancient insects, with 325 million year old fossils found with wing spans reaching 30 inches. They flew before and during the dinosaur time period. They are aggressive predators both during much of their lifespan spent under the water or while flying.

They begin life on the water when the female deposits eggs on the surface or injects her eggs into aquatic plants. Depending on the species, they can live one to six years under water as nymphs, then spend several weeks flying, typically near the water.

They can daily eat hundreds of mosquitoes both as larvae and when winged. They eat other aquatic insects, small fish and tadpoles. They need better than average water quality to thrive. They will molt 9-16 times, then will crawl out of the water onto a stem, reed or rock for the final molting. Once they dry, they are fully functioning fliers that capture their prey 95% of the time due to their nearly 360-degree eyesight and over 30,000 lenses on their magnificent compound eyes.

Their aerial maneuvers are spectacular as their four wings can move independently as they fly up, down, forward, back and can stop to hover. They have been clocked at just under 40 miles per hour.

Five species migrate, with the common Green Darner, the most recognizable. A decedent may return in the early spring, typically in mid-April. The largest populations are resident species that emerge in June, then can be seen in July and August, with some living until early to mid-September, but June, July and early August are the best viewing months for this fun to watch and photograph flier. In the fall, mass migrations can sometimes be spotted hitting your windshield and covering roadways.

Iowa Odes has 75 species listed for Iowa. To view other dragonflies or to learn more about them, go to https://iowaodes.org.

Info credits to Wikepedia.comThoughtco.com and Iowaodes.org

 

 

Dam Safety Message by Iowa DNR

Paddling season has arrived and with it all the hazards that we need to watch out for. Low head dams are “drowning machines” and they are called that for a reason. Check out this Iowa DNR Facebook Live special for everything you need to know!

This is a great video experiment from right at the top of Iowa’s deadliest low head dam, the Center Street dam in Des Moines, Iowa.

Be safe this paddling season and without a doubt, stay away from low head dams on rivers!

https://www.facebook.com/iowadnr/videos/10155353595452111/

Monthly Feature: Get Acquainted with a Water Trail Skunk River: Story County

Features: lots of fallen trees creating both hazards and habitat. Old bridges and dams; dams that need portaged and constructed rock rapids.

Classified: “non-meandered” stream. That means that the State of Iowa owns the water flowing through it, but not the land adjacent to it or under it. That’s all private land. Please respect it and don’t trespass. Even though you can’t get out or camp along this beautiful stream, there’s plenty to see along the way!

Access Points: 10 access points with 32 total miles of river corridor

Skills Needed: Intermediate for the first 15 miles of water trail, then beginner and all skill levels last 17 miles. Check the specific sections on the map at
https://www.iowadnr.gov/Things-to-Do/Canoeing-Kayaking/Water-Trail-Maps-Brochures

River drop: < 2 feet

Possible wildlife views of: beaver, wood ducks, deer, raccoons

Tree species: silver maple, sycamore, cottonwood and oak

Brochures and maps: Can be downloaded and paper copies can be picked up at assorted Conservation offices and Nature Centers. Go to https://www.iowadnr.gov/ for online viewing.

A good way to plan your trip is by using the IDNR Interactive Mapping Services resource. Go to the IMS Guide for instructions on how to use the Interactive Mapping Services, or access the IMS directly by going to Recreation Map at https://www.iowadnr.gov

*Credits: Excerpts taken from the Iowa DNR Water Trail brochure: Skunk River: Story County

I’ve Swamped and I Can’t Roll, Now What? Kayak Re-entry

Photo Credits Courtesy of  http://EasternSlopes.com

Classes, research, and technique practice:

There are many methods to re-enter your swamped kayak with no assist if the unexpected capsize arises. If you spend time in a kayak, learning a couple options is valuable knowledge to have. Taking a class is time well spent if you have classes available to you with most classes happening at annual early spring Paddle Expos, Fests or winter pool sessions. Another option is to conduct some YouTube research, then practice your new knowledge. New techniques and videos are surfacing each year showing several variations of the one person side re-entry and the back scramble along with the two person rescue.

Spend some time acquainting yourself with the assorted techniques. Then, go rent a pool for a couple of hours or if the water is warm enough to avoid hypothermia, go with friends to a small lake (with permission, if needed) to provide you the practice you need to learn the skill.

Remember to have one to two people in support kayaks that can help assist if you need some help during your practice. Staying close to shore in water just over your head is best. Wear your PFD and zip up and tighten all the straps so if someone pulls on it, it can not go over your head.

Self-rescue requires some gear: 
Common side re-entry techniques require the use of a “paddle float” with two options available; the inflatable type or fully padded option. Either can be used as an outrigger when strapped to your paddle end, then placed under your coaming on your kayak, near your seat. The padded type does not require inflation and can assist quicker if hypothermia or busy speed boat activity makes minutes count for re-entry. Climbing onto, then up your paddle float applied paddle shaft for support, works easily, especially if the water is not rough. Climb onto your kayak cockpit facing backward with your belly facing down, then corkscrew yourself around, keeping your balance to right yourself. Remove water by baling or bilging is the final step. Keeping the paddle float on a bit longer will help until you empty the water out.

For added success in climbing back in your cockpit, having a “stirrup” can aid your ability to re-enter quickly. Especially if your are not strong, agile or are overweight. It can be as simple as getting a clothes line or nylon rope, measuring for the circumference of your cockpit size, then add about four more feet so the rope extends just under your kayak so you can use it to step on. The kayak stirrup can be purchased inexpensively from suppliers.

Water removal:
A “bilge pump” is also an important asset to remove water quickly once you re-enter. Having some type of “baler” can be a huge time saver when it counts, especially for those one hull kayaks. A gallon milk jug with the lid on, then cut in half is a free option.

The “Cowboy” back scramble method is climbing onto the stern from either side, then staying low for balance and scrambling slowly toward your cockpit with legs extended out on either side for balance. Staying low is key. Then let your bottom drop into your seat once you get past your cockpit.

A two-person “t-rescue” is a much easier undertaking. Remove water by placing your filled boat upside down over the bow just above their cockpit to drain. Then have them come parallel along your boat, as they hold your boat firmly, almost laying on it, just above the cockpit as you climb in. Having the outrigger with your paddle and paddle float attached is helpful.

Practice with your personal kayak:
It is wise to practice with each person’s own kayak and the gear. When you know how your kayak handles being filled with water, you gain new perspectives on your and your boats abilities on the water in case of unexpected capsize. A two hull boat will be much easier to re-enter due to the increased flotation. One hull boat’s flotation is limited, but re-entry can be done, but it is most important to get most of the water out before you try to re-enter.

Let me know how your research and practice goes at iowawta@gmail.com

 

Check the Iowa DNR Interactive Map Before You Go!

The new interactive paddling map displays any major river hazards the Iowa DNR knows or learns about. A major river hazard is typically one that requires walking your boat around (portaging) the obstruction. These could be river wide log jams, bridge construction projects where a coffer dam was built, or debris or hazardous materials in the water, etc. So before you go paddling this season be sure to check the map at http://www.iowadnr.gov/paddlingmap.
Realize, too, that major hazards can pop up anywhere without us knowing. In fact, most hazards we learn about come from paddlers who first encountered them. This map does not account for common or general hazards, and it’s always important to scout or be vigilant when paddling anywhere.

New Report of a River-wide Logjam on Upper Iowa

Just recently an Iowa paddler reported a river-wide logjam on the Upper Iowa River while paddling upstream of Kendallville. He described it well and explained how difficult it was to portage around it. It was located right around a bend in the river so he and his friends had very little time to respond. A couple of his friends were pulled under by the strainer, but managed to make it out okay. He also included a photo and Lat/Long coordinates. This was very helpful, as
I was able to quickly add the hazard to the map in less than 5 minutes.

Our default view or map extent shows dams in red squares and other major hazards in orange diamonds with white exclamation points.

Default View of DNR Interactive Paddling Map. Red circle and arrow shows location of river wide log jam on Upper Iowa River.

In order to learn more about the Upper Iowa River hazard, you can zoom in and click on the hazard icon:

Click on the photo link “IMG_0012.JPG “under the heading “Attachments” to view the photo(s):

You can also change the basemap from topographic to aerial photo view:

Green Mill Ford Bridge Collapse

Earlier this year an historic bridge, the Green Mill Ford Bridge on the Cedar River (upstream of Janesville), washed out and remnants of the bridge created a number of hazards downstream for boaters. Debris from the bridge’s steel spans punctured a motor boat, and parts of the bridge have acted as strainers and obstacles in different areas. The emergency
management coordinator reached out to us and gave updated reports on the location of the debris, which we added to the interactive map. Try using the interactive paddling map on your own to locate those hazards on the Cedar River in Black Hawk County and review the photos and information for each location.

Cedar River upstream of Janesville in Black Hawk County

If you encounter a dangerous hazard, such as a river wide log jam, email me at john.wenck@dnr.iowa.gov. Remember to provide a detailed description of the hazard, the difficulty in avoiding or portaging around it. Also include photos and
location coordinates (latitude/longitude, UTM, etc).

If you’re new to using the interactive map, you can download instructions on how to use it here:
http://www.iowadnr/paddlingmap. Click on “Interactive Paddling Map – How To”—as shown below.

Clean, Drain and Dry to Avoid Aquatic Hitchhikers

 

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) reminds all boaters and anglers to “Clean, Drain, and Dry” their boats and equipment to protect Iowa lakes and rivers from aquatic hitchhikers.

Aquatic hitchhikers are invasive species – everything from zebra mussels to Eurasian watermilfoil – that move from one waterbody to another by hitchhiking on boats, in bait buckets and on other equipment used in the water. They often grow quickly and spread fast when brought to another lake or stream due to lack of natural controls.
“The best way to control the negative impacts of aquatic invasive species in Iowa is to prevent their spread to new waterbodies,” said Kim Bogenschutz, aquatic invasive species coordinator for the Iowa DNR.

These aquatic invasive species can create serious problems for Iowa waters by reducing native species and making lakes and rivers unusable for boaters, anglers and swimmers.
Boaters and anglers can unintentionally spread aquatic hitchhikers if they do not take the proper precautions each time they leave a lake or river.

  • CLEAN any plants, animals, or mud from your boat and equipment before you leave a waterbody.
  • DRAIN water from all equipment (motor, live well, bilge, transom well, bait bucket) before you leave a waterbody.
  • DRY anything that comes into contact with water (boats, trailers, equipment, boots, clothing, dogs). Before you move to another waterbody either: Spray your boat and trailer with hot or high-pressure water; or Dry your boat and equipment for at least five days.
  • Never release plants, fish, or animals into a water body unless they came out of that water body and empty unwanted bait in the trash.

It is illegal to possess or transport prohibited aquatic invasive species. It is illegal to transport any aquatic plants on water-related equipment in Iowa. Signs posted at public accesses remind boaters to stop aquatic hitchhikers and identify infested waters.

Boaters must also drain all water from boats and equipment before they leave a water access and keep drain plugs removed or opened during transport. It is also illegal to introduce any live fish, except for hooked bait, into public waters.
Find more information about aquatic invasive species and a list of infested waters in the current Iowa Fishing Regulations or at https://www.iowadnr.gov/ais.

Iowa Threatened & Endangered Species

You cannot take, possess, transport, import, export, process, sell or offer for sale, buy or offer to buy, nor can a common or contract carrier transport or receive for shipment any of the following species of fish, frogs, turtles, mussels or salamanders:
Fish:
Lake Sturgeon, Pallid Sturgeon, Pugnose Shiner, Weed Shiner, Pearl Dace, Freckled Madtom, Bluntnose Darter, Least Darter, American Brook Lamprey, Chestnut Lamprey, Grass Pickerel, Blacknose Shiner, Western Sand Darter, Black Redhorse, Burbot, Orangethroat Darter, Topeka Shiner
Frogs:
Crawfish Frog
Turtles:
Yellow Mud Turtle, Wood Turtle, Ornate Box Turtle, Common Musk Turtle, Blanding’s Turtle
Mussels:
Spectacle Case, Slippershell, Buckhorn, Ozark Pigtoe, Bullhead, Ohio River Pigtoe, Slough Sandshell, Yellow Sandshell, Cylinder, Strange Floater, Creek Heelsplitter, Purple Pimpleback, Butterfly, Ellipse and the Higgin’s Eye Pearly Mussel
Salamanders:
Blue-spotted Salamander, Central Newt and the Mudpuppy.
Info credits to Iowa DNR
Photo credits by Wikipedia